A week in Whitby – day six

FRIDAY 25th MAY

After the previous two days, of opening the blinds to be greeted by a swirling grey mist, I hadn’t been in any hurry, to look outside. T had got up, put the kettle and made a morning cuppa, before I’d even opened my eyes.

“You not getting up today fossil” he asks, as he passes me my tea, “there’s blue sky everywhere out there”

What!!!!, I reached up and opened the blinds, and looked out of the window,WOW! I could see the horizon, the sky was blue, the sea was blue, and sunlight glistened from its surface. What an absolutely perfect day 🙂

Needless to say, the bedding was put away in double quick time, and every window was opened fully.

Sal and Jasp had their breakfast outside, as they had done all week, but this time so did we, our ‘neighbours’ had moved on earlier in the week, and our van was the only one on that part of the site. We sat there long after we’d finished eating, in total silence, just ‘looking’ at nothing in particular.

“Do you fancy doing anything today then” T broke my daydream…….

“err, no, not really, I’m quite happy staying put, and I’m sure Jasp would appreciate a rest too”

Sal & Jasp still needed a walk, and I wanted to go into Whitby to get a few more photos, so we decided, a slow walk along the cliff top to the Abbey, T would stay up at the top with the dogs, while I walked down the Donkey road into the town with my camera.

‘Give me a call if you’re going to be longer than an hour, and I’ll start slowly back” he shouted after me as I set off down the hill.

Whitby is a photographers dream, and it wasn’t long before I’d started snapping away.

This is about halfway down Donkey Road, with the harbour just visible in the distance.

Turning round and looking back up towards the top, the raised sections of cobbles across the road become more noticeable, which give more traction while going up or down.

It was up Donkey Road in January 1881, that the Whitby lifeboat was hauled to top, before continuing to Robin Hoods Bay to the rescue of the brig ‘Visitor” see A week in Whitby Day Three post.

A plaque at the bottom.

I wandered around taking many photographs, before phoning T to tell him I was on my way back up.

This time I decided to walk up Caedmon’s Trod, where we’d attempted to get Jasper up on Day Two. A beautiful view of the town, but I’m pleased we turned back with Jasper when we did that day, as he would never have got to the top.

I found T and the dogs, waiting for me in the grounds of St Marys’ church, where I took this view over the harbour.

I took a further shot of the Abbey, before we set off back along the coast path.

A wreck of the trawler Admiral Von Tromp, which foundered on the rocks in October 1976, is easily visible from the cliff top as the tide recedes. More info for anyone interested can be read here

A view of the site, as we walked back. Our motorhome is the one at the far left on the cliff top.

This day was a very lazy day, were we just enjoyed the sun and the scenery.

Curry again? 😮 yeah, why not, we’re on holiday 😉

A week in Whitby – day two

MONDAY 21st MAY

After a really good nights sleep, we woke to the sound of tapping on the roof, oh no!, it can’t be rain surely, on opening the blinds, I realised it was seagulls dancing on the roof, obviously pay back time for denying them our scraps last night.

Jasp was still spark out, blocking the bathroom door, and a bleary eyed Little Sal was peering at us from between the front seats in the cab. Not for long mind, for as soon as T got up and put the kettle on (kettle in Sals mind means breakfast), she leapt up, tried to jump over the sleeping Jasp and landed on him,  Poor Jasp, wondering where he is and what the hell is happening, struggled to his feet while Sal is going into hyper mode.

Eventually calm reigns, the dogs having eaten were lying outside, the bedding was stored away (a darn sight faster than we got it out I might add), T had gone down to the site cafe for breakfast, I just sat and absorbed the peace and the stunning view of the sea.

The Cleveland Way footpath, runs through the campsite. This National Trail is approx 110 miles long, between Hemsley and Filey taking in the North Yorkshire moors and the North Yorkshire coast. This view is looking south towards Robin Hoods Bay.

Once T had come back from the cafe, we decided to do our bit of the Cleveland way. As it was just one mile along the cliff top to Whitby, it would be a good level walk for the dogs (poor Jasp can’t cope with much more these days), we could have a wander around the town, then amble back.

Heading towards Whitby Abbey on the Cleveland Way, the dogs loved it.

What we hadn’t accounted for was the steep descent from the Abbey into the town, part of which must have been 45 degrees. The further down we went, the more concerned I was as to how we’d get Jasp back up again, but always the optimist, T said we’ll find some way.

We had a lovely wander around the town, which hasn’t changed much from how I remember it from my childhood.

Waiting outside one of the many chippies was this rather well fed seagull.

After a few hours of wandering, we decided we’d better make a move back to the campsite. Before leaving home I’d researched the local buses, and found dogs travelled free, as we both had our bus passes with us, T went in search of a bus that would go past the site.

Sal Jasp and I waited patiently for his return.

He came back shaking his head, “I can’t find which bus we need, looks like we’ll have to walk back” So we set off in search of a different route back up to the Abbey.

After checking a town map, we decided we’d try a route called Caedmon’s Trod. This was an even bigger disaster, it was all steps, and quite deep ones too, Jasp collapsed on the second set of steps, when his back legs gave way, after getting him onto his feet, we then had to help him back down to the bottom.

We made our way back to the steep Donkey Road, ready for the slow climb up, not before Jasp became a film star though, when a chap with a posh SLR camera asked if he could take his photograph. Several poses later, we started the climb, and after stopping many times, we eventually reached the top for the level cliff top walk back.

That evening, after a meal of pizza, salad and a bottle of red wine, we proceeded to make the bed. Yes, T was having his choice of the massive double, king or whatever you want to call it. Now believe me, this is not a feat easily accomplished, when half the motorhome is bed, it is almost impossible for two people to make the bed up, as there is nowhere to stand, especially when the other half is taken up by two dogs, one of which insists that he is sleeping in front of the bathroom door again. At least with two singles I had some spare floor, so I left T to it, and sat in the cab until it was done………….hmmmm, I could get used to this 🙂